Pork Pie – ‘Post Maudlin’ EP – Heart-rending post-punk brilliance.

Western-Super-Mare post-punk trio Pork Pie release EP ‘Post Maudlin’ on Breakfast Records.

You’ll struggle to think of a band name more British than Pork Pie, a simple Google search for the band will leave you lost somewhere between raucous waves of post-punk fury and one of the most misunderstood delicacies in modern British cuisine.

Idolise the Idle is taken from the bands new EP Post Maudlin, and is an introduction to the bands new direction and sound, the trio have made bold steps since we were first introduced to them by Bristol duo Something Anorak in an interview back in March.

Post Maudlin starts with the husky yet crisp vocals of singer Josh Hooper, as opening track Hallow Guitar comes on like a long lost relic from The National. A story told over a simple haunting guitar line which ends in a wave of disaster and fury. The song feeds into Fruit Machine which brings with it a bass groove for the part storyteller, part out-of-bodily vocal to rage upon. Manic stabs of guitar and crashing cymbals adorn a howling chorus as a spine-chilling tantrum brakes over the track.

The brief but sprawling cinematic centrepiece of the EP is Your Side, it feels like the glue balancing the more fragile moments of songwriting with the all out thrashing post-punk urges. Cue the emotion roller coaster, Dinner And Wine is the reflective, touching ode to unresolved inner turmoil. Before the track naturally implodes, we find the band in their most exposed state as the lyrics cut like knives and build into sonic oblivion. Idolise the Idle is a fitting ending to 5 tracks that seek explanation in real life confusion. The final track opens softly with Josh Hooper’s bleak social commentary fusing excellently with the bands dark soundscape, the track climbs to a feeling of euphoric closure as the drums rattle and shake alongside the last touches of guitar, which fade into mist. The track brings to mind the sort of heart-rending storytelling of Brooklyn band The Antlers, yet with it’s own very British feel.

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5 minutes with… SILVA.

No Violet – ‘Be My Friend’ – A high-octane, riff-ready, rock and roller coaster.

Drahla – ‘Twelve Divisions of the Day’ – A swirling mass of motorik post-punk.

headofhearinglogov5By Karl Johnson

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